Jobs Information Strategies

Jobs Information Strategies

More About Me...

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, nisl elit viverra sollicitudin phasellus eros, vitae a mollis. Congue sociis amet, fermentum lacinia sed, orci auctor in vitae amet enim. Ridiculus nullam proin vehicula nulla euismod id. Ac est facilisis eget, ligula lacinia, vitae sed lorem nunc. Orci at nulla risus ullamcorper arcu. Nunc integer ornare massa diam sollicitudin.

Another Tit-Bit...

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, nisl elit viverra sollicitudin phasellus eros, vitae a mollis. Congue sociis amet, fermentum lacinia sed, orci auctor in vitae amet enim. Ridiculus nullam proin vehicula nulla euismod id. Ac est facilisis eget, ligula lacinia, vitae sed lorem nunc.

Interview Myths - Part 1

One important reason people fail at interviews is because of several

misconceptions, or myths, about what really happens during the course of an interview. ll of us know that the purpose of interviews is for an interviewer to hire someone who will perform well in a particular job, but beyond that few people fully grasp how interviews really work and what makes one candidate stand out more than another. This lack of understanding represents a major obstacle to maximising performance when sitting efore an interviewer and trying to give your best answers. Interviews are no different to other endeavors in life: the better you understand how they work (or don’t work), the higher the probability of tackling them successfully. An understanding of the underlying dynamics inherent in most interviews is an important start to improving your interview performance.

Myth no. 1: The best person for the job gets it



Sometimes this is true—especially in a situation where everyone knows everyone else, such as when a company is recruiting internally. However, this is often not the case. In order for the best person for the job to win it, a number of very important things need to be in place (and even then, there’s no guarantee). These include:

    • The interviewer knows what questions to ask and how to search for the truthfulness in answers. These two things may sound simple enough, but I can assure you that a large proportion of people conducting interviews have received no training, lack interview experience and often do not even go to the trouble of preparing for the interview.
    • The interviewer is not taken in by the charm, good looks, great humour or any other aspect of the interviewee. This can be a difficult obstacle, even for experienced interviewers.
    • The interviewee has learned how to clearly articulate their skills, key achievements and how they can add value to the organisation.
    • There is no personality clash between interviewer and interviewee.
    • Neither party is having a bad day.


Some employers—usually the ones who have been badly burnt by hiring the wrong people in the past—go to great lengths to set up professional hiring procedures designed to minimise hiring mistakes. Whilst some of these procedures are effective in improving candidate selection, they do not guarantee that the best person for the job will actually win it. In the final analysis, choosing someone for a job involves at least one human being making a decision about another, and no matter what we do to eliminate subjectivity, as human beings it is impossible to put aside our predispositions, predilections and personal preferences—no matter how much we may try to.

continued to Part 2

1 comments:

  1. koekoeh said...
     

    NICE POSTING!


    www.koekoeh.co.cc

Post a Comment