Jobs Information Strategies

Jobs Information Strategies

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Interview Myths - Part 2

tag : Interview Myths - Part 1

Also unlike many exams, there are often no right or wrong answers in interviews. We’re all different and come to interviews from different backgrounds and business sitations. What is important at an interview is to justify your actions and talk about your achievements in a confident manner.

Myth no. 3: Interviewers know what they’re doing



Some interviewers are very good at what they do, especially fulltime professionals (provided they’re not suffering from interview fatigue). However, many managers and owners of small businesses often flounder because interviewing is not something they do on a regular basis. Some sure signs of a bad interviewer are:

    • They do most of the talking.
    • They sound as though they’ve made up their mind about you in the first five minutes.
    • They seem to pluck their questions randomly out of the ether.
    • Their phone keeps ringing and they answer it.
    • They sound like very sharp and less-than-honest salespeople when it comes to selling the job.


Some sure signs of a good interviewer are:

    • They have their questions carefully prepared in advance.
    • They want to know what you’ve done and how you’ve done it, including specific examples.
    • They let you do most of the talking.
    • They may want to interview you more than once.
    • They will try to make you feel at ease.
    • They are genuinely interested in your accomplishments, skills and the type of person you are.


In experienced interviewers generally don’t ask the right questions and can easily be swayed by factors that have little to do with your ability to perform in the job. So if you are being interviewed by an inexperienced interviewer, don’t wait to be asked a good question one that will allow you to talk about all your wonderful skills and qualities. Rather, take the initiative in as unobtrusive a way as possible and talk about the things you feel the interviewer might really want to know. Unfortunately, this may not always be possible especially if you’re being interviewed by a forceful personality who loves the sound of their own voice. If ever you find yourself in such a situation, don’t panic. Remind yourself that interviews are just as much about rapport-building as they are about answering questions. So nod your head, smile and make all the right noises—talk active interviewers love people who agree with them.

Myth no. 4: Never say ‘I don’t know’



Interviews are about making a positive impression by answering questions intelligently and building rapport with the interviewer. To this end, many interviewees feel that they have to provide the perfect answer to every question put to them, irrespective of whether or not they actually know the answer. Clearly, a great interview is one in which you can answer all the questions (and you should be able to do so if you take the time to prepare correctly); however, if you don’t know the answer to something, it is better to admit to it rather than pretend to know and start waffling. Most interviewers
can pick waffling a mile away and they don’t like it for a couple of very important reasons: first, it is likely to make you sound dishonest; and second, it will make you sound considerably less than intelligent. You may as well not attend the interview if you give the impression that you’re neither honest nor bright.
Trying to answer a question that you have little idea about could undermine an otherwise great interview. This does not mean that you cannot attempt answers that you are unsure of. There’s nothing wrong with having a go, as long as you make your uncertainty clear to the interviewer at the outset. Here’s what an answer may sound like:

I have to be honest and say that this is not an area I’m familiar with, though I am very interested in it. If you like, I’m happy to have a go at trying to address the issue, as long as you’re not expecting the perfect answer.

Or:

I’d love to answer that question, but I need to be honest upfront and say that this is not an area that I’m overly familiar with, though I’m very interested in increasing my knowledge about it.


continued to Part 3

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